How to build a creatiVision power supply

Discuss the CreatiVision hardware: models, revisions, fixing, hacking and modding.
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MADrigal
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How to build a creatiVision power supply

Post by MADrigal » Fri Jul 04, 2008 6:22 pm

Hello,

I'm willing to help you build a power supply for your creatiVision, international PAL version.

The following diagram is not valid to build a power supply for the Japanese NTSC model, which is "AC to DC" type.

Here's the list of items you need:

1x "AC to AC" transformer "220/240V to 9V" at 1A
1x "AC to AC" transformer "220/240V to 16,5/18V" at 0,250/0,300A
1x fuse holder
1x 600mA fuse
1x plastic/metal box to fit all the above stuff
1x 2-wires cable with power plug. 1,5/2 metres should be fine
1x 4-wires cable. 1,5/2 metres should be fine
1x round 5-pin DIN plug

Please feel free to ask for more infos, in case you need help.

PS: please notice that the middle pin of the 5-pin DIN plug is not connected to any wire

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Stilgar
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Re: How to build a creatiVision power supply

Post by Stilgar » Fri Jul 04, 2008 11:29 pm

Much appreciated, this diagram looks sooooo much better than the one you showed me a while ago. This will be of great help this sunday when i will built it.
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carlsson
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Re: How to build a creatiVision power supply

Post by carlsson » Tue Oct 08, 2013 10:33 pm

Haha! I had completely overlooked this thread!

I suppose an R-Core transformer used for preamps might be suitable, something like this. Those have two 9VAC circuits at 0.8A each, that might be possible to wire up in serial, and two 15VAC circuits at 0.5A each, of which only one would be required. Since the voltages will be converted to 5VDC and 12VDC internally, 15VAC input probably won't matter? I still wonder about feeding it directly with DC though, how many volt are required to pass through the voltage converter.
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Re: How to build a creatiVision power supply

Post by kevgal » Thu Aug 07, 2014 1:24 am

Might not be a good idea to use 15v AC power into the 5v circuit - one of the rectifier caps is only rated to 16v - could cause some damage. Dual 5v and 12v DC switch modes are quite common and cheap with much better regulation better to use these and bypass the bridge rectifiers in circuit.
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Re: How to build a creatiVision power supply

Post by Mamejay » Tue Nov 04, 2014 3:42 am

carlsson wrote:Haha! I had completely overlooked this thread!

I suppose an R-Core transformer used for preamps might be suitable, something like this. Those have two 9VAC circuits at 0.8A each, that might be possible to wire up in serial, and two 15VAC circuits at 0.5A each, of which only one would be required. Since the voltages will be converted to 5VDC and 12VDC internally, 15VAC input probably won't matter? I still wonder about feeding it directly with DC though, how many volt are required to pass through the voltage converter.
This looks like the cheapest option to get a power supply built. Will the 15VAC be enough as the stock is 16VAC?
I suspect it should be enough to run the console. I need a cheap option to test my console as I do not have a power supply for it and don't want to spend a heap in case it doesn't work.

Thanks
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Re: How to build a creatiVision power supply

Post by MADrigal » Tue Nov 04, 2014 7:58 am

If you provide 15V only, you should also provide more ampere's. It's never a good idea to provide lower voltage than requested because it causes more heating to the electric parts.
I would suggest to buy a cheap 18V transformer, eventually at 500 mA.
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Re: How to build a creatiVision power supply

Post by Mamejay » Tue Nov 04, 2014 8:51 am

MADrigal wrote:If you provide 15V only, you should also provide more ampere's. It's never a good idea to provide lower voltage than requested because it causes more heating to the electric parts.
I would suggest to buy a cheap 18V transformer, eventually at 500 mA.
I have decided to source out one of these
http://www.doss.com.au/ac9n16v-9v-16v-d ... -ac-power/

Cheap option and looks to have everything we need
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Re: How to build a creatiVision power supply

Post by MADrigal » Tue Nov 04, 2014 8:59 am

make sure the 9v and 16,5v are placed in the correct order (on the plug, i mean), and that they're AC-to-AC.
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Re: How to build a creatiVision power supply

Post by Mamejay » Wed Nov 05, 2014 2:37 am

Looks like the DOSS power suppliers are no longer available.
I am now looking at the following 2 transformers.

http://www.ebay.com.au/itm/1PC-EI-Ferri ... 451wt_1125
http://www.ebay.com.au/itm/10W-EI-Ferri ... 619wt_1125

If someone can help me determine the amps of these.
I used the following calculator to determine the amps.
http://www.rapidtables.com/calc/electri ... ulator.htm
For the 9VAC 2 watt power supply I got 1amp and for the 18VAC 10 watt I got 1amp also. Would this be correct?
I will wait to hear from you before making a purchase.
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Re: How to build a creatiVision power supply

Post by carlsson » Mon Nov 10, 2014 3:00 pm

Dunno, but it seems 9VAC 2W is much too weak, as you will want 1A. Even with the power factor in play as per AC transformers, you want more.

In the R-Core transformer, I would wire up the two 9VAC 0.8A lines in serial to get a 9VAC 1.6A, and use one of the two 15VAC 0.5A lines instead of the 16.5VAC 0.25A in the original supply. Too bad about the DOSS one, but there ought to be someone in China who manufactures something similar at a low price while still being electrically safe.
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